Candidate and Campaign Contact Information

Contact Info

Address
Committee To Elect Sean Delahanty
C/O Dolores Delahanty
1501 Iroquois Parkway
Louisville, KY 40214
Mobile
502-931-3593
Email Accounts

campaign@louisvilleelection.com

sean@louisvilleelection.com – Judge Sean Delahanty

dolores@louisvilleelection.com – Campaign Manager

matthew@louisvilleelection.com – Technical

Contact The Campaign

Use this form to contact the campaign. Volunteer, Donations and Yard Signs have their own pages accessible from the header menu at the top of the page.

Recent FAQs

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The current 2018 Jefferson County District Court Judges in Louisville, KY’s 30th District are
Division 1: Annette Karem
Division 2: Amber B. Wolf
Division 3: Sandra L. McLaughlin
Division 4: Todd Hollenbach
Division 5: Jennifer Leibson
Division 6: Sean R. Delahanty
Division 7: Jennifer Bryant Wilcox
Division 8: David P. Bowles
Division 9: Andre L. Bergeron
Division 10: Sara Michael Nicholson
Division 11: Jessica Moore
Division 12: Eric Haner
Division 13: Anne Delahanty
Division 14: Stephanie Pearce Burke
Division 15: Anne Haynie
Division 16: Katie King
Division 17: Erica Lee Williams

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    Voting Rights Restoration

    In Kentucky, non-violent felons can apply for voting rights registration/record expungement 5 years after their probation or the end of their sentence.  Complete the Restoration of Civil Rights Application and return it to the Kentucky Department Of Corrections address at the bottom of the application.  It can take 12 weeks before the application is processed so completing it early is important.
    You can read more about the process and challenges here in Kentucky provided by the Brennan Center.  It discusses the changes Gov. Beshear rook before leaving office and the changes Gov. Matt Bevin took to undo the reforms.
    Voting is an important right, despite the current process you should complete the application.  Voting Rights will only be restored if you actively seek them.

    Following an executive order on December 22, 2015 by the state’s governor, Kentucky’s felony disenfranchisement law is once again one of the harshest in the nation. Its constitution permanently bars all individuals with past felony convictions from voting, unless the governor restores the right to vote. – Brennan Center

    Restoration of Civil Rights 3-2016

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    What is Arraignment Court

    An arraignment in Arraignment Court is a court proceeding at which a criminal defendant is formally advised of the charges against him and is asked to enter a plea to the charges. In many states, the court may also decide at arraignment whether the defendant will be released pending trial.

    The Arraignment Process

    Arraignment is the initial court hearing whereby a person charged with a crime is advised of his or her criminal charges. Additionally, the person will be advised of his or her constitutional rights and their first pre-trial or probable cause hearing date. The court will set bond and any accompanying conditions. For example, someone may be released on his or her own recognizance (R.O.R.) but prohibited from contact with the alleged victim or place of the violation. Those defendants with some form of suspended or probated sentences may also expect to be served with written notice of the prosecutor’s intent to seek revocation of that jail sentence. For those facing felony charges who are not released or do not post bond, the prosecutor must provide a preliminary or probable cause hearing on or before the 10th day after arraignment, excluding weekends and holidays. Those individuals who are charged with a felony and released from jail are entitled to a probable cause hearing within 20 days of their arraignment, again excluding weekends and holidays.
    If the person is in custody, his or her arraignment will be held at the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections. You will not be permitted inside the secure courtroom; however, the court has set up a room for relatives and interested parties to watch the arraignment on a closed-circuit two-way television system. When your friend or loved one appears before the judge, you may appear at a lectern that has a two-way camera with the judge. The judge may ask you questions regarding the defendant’s living arrangements, ties to the community, employment and other information the court may be interested in securing to determine an appropriate bond or conditions for release.

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    My parents who worked hard to improve our community for all of their working lives and well into retirement. My father was well known for representing indigent litigants pro bono particularly in issues of equal housing and human rights. My mother, a social worker, worked full time while raising five children in an era not always kind to women’s issues. Both of my parents are honored in the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame.

    Category: Sean Delahanty

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    I do the best I know how, every day, and my goal is to help people make positive changes in their lives. It is a blessing to work at a job that you enjoy and I frequently hear positive feedback from litigants who have appeared before me.

    Category: Sean Delahanty

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